Jim Beam Bourbon Whiskey's Family

  • Jim Beam Bourbon Whiskey Bourbon Whiskey 3 cl
  • Jim Beam Bourbon Whiskey Black Label Bourbon Whiskey 3 cl
  • Jim Beam Bourbon Whiskey`s Choice Bourbon Whiskey 3 cl
  • Jim Beam Bourbon Whiskey Rye Whiskey 3 cl
  • Bonded Bourbon Whiskey 3 cl
- Cocktails

Any Glass of your Choice

Jim Beam Bourbon Whiskey's Familyjim beam's family is a popular Bourbon cocktail containing a combinations of Jim Beam Bourbon Whiskey Bourbon Whiskey,Jim Beam Bourbon Whiskey Black Label Bourbon Whiskey,Jim Beam Bourbon Whiskey`s Choice Bourbon Whiskey,Jim Beam Bourbon Whiskey Rye Whiskey,Bonded Bourbon Whiskey .Served using Any Glass of your Choice

Jim Beam Bourbon Whiskey's Family Ingredients

Jim Beam Bourbon Whiskey Bourbon Whiskey,Jim Beam Bourbon Whiskey Black Label Bourbon Whiskey,Jim Beam Bourbon Whiskey`s Choice ...

Jim Beam Bourbon Whiskey's Family Recipe

Combine all Jim Beam Bourbon Whiskey whiskey's in an old-fashioned glass, and serve (consume as a shot).
  • Jim Beam Bourbon Whiskey Bourbon Whiskeyjim-beam-bourbon-whiskey-bourbon-whiskey

    American's don't need to be lectured on Bourbon, but still, let's put it in record like all other spirits. A Bourbon in American spirit is a barrel-aged distilled liquor made primarily from corn. The name might have been derived from the French Bourbon dynasty, or from Bourbon County in Kentucky, or Bourbon Street in New Orleans, both named after the French Dynasty.

    Technically, most whiskey made in America are legally classified as Bourbon, although Bourbon is in spirit a Southern Whiskey with special connection to Kentucky. Note than although Tennessee Whiskey is classified as Bourbon, Tennessee distilleries do not prefer their whiskey to be unique and referred to as Tennessee Whiskey only.

    Distilling came to Kentucky in the late 18rth Century with the Scots, Scot-Irish and other settlers including English, Welsh, German and French, and they brought with them their distilling techniques and ageing processes in charred oak barrels. The charring is what gives the Bourbon the brownish colour and distinctive taste.

    To be a legal Bourbon, a whiskey has to meet the following criteria

        Produced in the United States and Territories (Puerto Rico) and the District of Columbia
        Made from a grain mixture that is at least 51% corn
        Aged in new, charred oak containers
        Distilled to no more than 160 (U.S.) proof (80% alcohol by volume)
        Entered into the container for aging at no more than 125 proof (62.5% alcohol by volume)
        Bottled (like other whiskeys) at 80 proof or more (40% alcohol by volume)


    Tennessee Whiskey meets all the requirements too, but they prefer keeping it distinct.

  • Jim Beam Bourbon Whiskey Black Label Bourbon Whiskeyjim-beam-bourbon-whiskey-black-label-bourbon-whiskey

    American's don't need to be lectured on Bourbon, but still, let's put it in record like all other spirits. A Bourbon in American spirit is a barrel-aged distilled liquor made primarily from corn. The name might have been derived from the French Bourbon dynasty, or from Bourbon County in Kentucky, or Bourbon Street in New Orleans, both named after the French Dynasty.

    Technically, most whiskey made in America are legally classified as Bourbon, although Bourbon is in spirit a Southern Whiskey with special connection to Kentucky. Note than although Tennessee Whiskey is classified as Bourbon, Tennessee distilleries do not prefer their whiskey to be unique and referred to as Tennessee Whiskey only.

    Distilling came to Kentucky in the late 18rth Century with the Scots, Scot-Irish and other settlers including English, Welsh, German and French, and they brought with them their distilling techniques and ageing processes in charred oak barrels. The charring is what gives the Bourbon the brownish colour and distinctive taste.

    To be a legal Bourbon, a whiskey has to meet the following criteria

        Produced in the United States and Territories (Puerto Rico) and the District of Columbia
        Made from a grain mixture that is at least 51% corn
        Aged in new, charred oak containers
        Distilled to no more than 160 (U.S.) proof (80% alcohol by volume)
        Entered into the container for aging at no more than 125 proof (62.5% alcohol by volume)
        Bottled (like other whiskeys) at 80 proof or more (40% alcohol by volume)


    Tennessee Whiskey meets all the requirements too, but they prefer keeping it distinct.

  • Jim Beam Bourbon Whiskey`s Choice Bourbon Whiskeyjim-beam-bourbon-whiskeys-choice-bourbon-whiskey

    American's don't need to be lectured on Bourbon, but still, let's put it in record like all other spirits. A Bourbon in American spirit is a barrel-aged distilled liquor made primarily from corn. The name might have been derived from the French Bourbon dynasty, or from Bourbon County in Kentucky, or Bourbon Street in New Orleans, both named after the French Dynasty.

    Technically, most whiskey made in America are legally classified as Bourbon, although Bourbon is in spirit a Southern Whiskey with special connection to Kentucky. Note than although Tennessee Whiskey is classified as Bourbon, Tennessee distilleries do not prefer their whiskey to be unique and referred to as Tennessee Whiskey only.

    Distilling came to Kentucky in the late 18rth Century with the Scots, Scot-Irish and other settlers including English, Welsh, German and French, and they brought with them their distilling techniques and ageing processes in charred oak barrels. The charring is what gives the Bourbon the brownish colour and distinctive taste.

    To be a legal Bourbon, a whiskey has to meet the following criteria

        Produced in the United States and Territories (Puerto Rico) and the District of Columbia
        Made from a grain mixture that is at least 51% corn
        Aged in new, charred oak containers
        Distilled to no more than 160 (U.S.) proof (80% alcohol by volume)
        Entered into the container for aging at no more than 125 proof (62.5% alcohol by volume)
        Bottled (like other whiskeys) at 80 proof or more (40% alcohol by volume)


    Tennessee Whiskey meets all the requirements too, but they prefer keeping it distinct.

  • Jim Beam Bourbon Whiskey Rye Whiskeyjim-beam-bourbon-whiskey-rye-whiskey

    Rye Whisky is essentially Canadian Whisky, Canadian corn whiskey uses some rye grain added to the mash to give it more flavour and this characteristic style and flavour gave Canadian Whisky the name Rye Whisky.

    But, Rye Whiskey can be American too, it is essentially a Bourbon but must be distilled from at least 51% rye grain to be labeled a Rye Whiskey.

    So the rule of thumb is, if it is referred to as Rye Whiskey it is American, and if its labeled as Rye Whisky, it is Canadian.

  • Bonded Bourbon Whiskeybonded-bourbon-whiskey

    American's don't need to be lectured on Bourbon, but still, let's put it in record like all other spirits. A Bourbon in American spirit is a barrel-aged distilled liquor made primarily from corn. The name might have been derived from the French Bourbon dynasty, or from Bourbon County in Kentucky, or Bourbon Street in New Orleans, both named after the French Dynasty.

    Technically, most whiskey made in America are legally classified as Bourbon, although Bourbon is in spirit a Southern Whiskey with special connection to Kentucky. Note than although Tennessee Whiskey is classified as Bourbon, Tennessee distilleries do not prefer their whiskey to be unique and referred to as Tennessee Whiskey only.

    Distilling came to Kentucky in the late 18rth Century with the Scots, Scot-Irish and other settlers including English, Welsh, German and French, and they brought with them their distilling techniques and ageing processes in charred oak barrels. The charring is what gives the Bourbon the brownish colour and distinctive taste.

    To be a legal Bourbon, a whiskey has to meet the following criteria

        Produced in the United States and Territories (Puerto Rico) and the District of Columbia
        Made from a grain mixture that is at least 51% corn
        Aged in new, charred oak containers
        Distilled to no more than 160 (U.S.) proof (80% alcohol by volume)
        Entered into the container for aging at no more than 125 proof (62.5% alcohol by volume)
        Bottled (like other whiskeys) at 80 proof or more (40% alcohol by volume)


    Tennessee Whiskey meets all the requirements too, but they prefer keeping it distinct.

There is an “official” list of cocktails

The International Bartenders Association ( IBA ) has a list of official cocktails. The cocktail list is divided into three categories: Unforgettable ( Gin Fizz, Sidecar and Negroni for example ), Contemporary Classics ( including Cosmopolitan, Sex on the Beach and Black Russian ) and New Era Drinks ( Espresso Martini, Vesper and Darn 'N' Stormy are a few ). Check the list of IBA's official cocktails here

  • Old Fashioned Glassold-fashioned-glass

    Old fashioned Glass, rocks glass or lowball glass, is a short tumbler used to server whisky, neat or on the rocks.

    It is used to serve some cocktails like "Old Fashioned" , the cocktail from which it derives it name. A traditional and true Old Fashioned Glass is a cut glass classic design, but modern glasses usually are pressed glasses that are formed in a mold, but the essential English design is retained.

    An Old Fashioned Glass with a plain wall is a lowball.

    Old Fahioned Glasses contain 160-300 ml, while a Double Old Fashioned Glass contains 350-470 ml.

  • Old-Fashioned Glassold-fashioned-glass

    Old fashioned Glass, rocks glass or lowball glass, is a short tumbler used to server whisky, neat or on the rocks.

    It is used to serve some cocktails like "Old Fashioned" , the cocktail from which it derives it name. A traditional and true Old Fashioned Glass is a cut glass classic design, but modern glasses usually are pressed glasses that are formed in a mold, but the essential English design is retained.

    An Old Fashioned Glass with a plain wall is a lowball.

    Old Fahioned Glasses contain 160-300 ml, while a Double Old Fashioned Glass contains 350-470 ml.

  • Simple Guide to Cocktail Glasswareany-glass

    When there is no specific glass suggested for a cocktail, it's up to you to chose a glass.
    Either you just go ahead and serve using any glass available to you following these simple rules
    A. Go for Tall or Collins Glasses, Highball Glasses or even Hurricane Glasses for cocktails with loads of non-alcoholic mixes, and those that require crushed or cubed ices,
    B. But if your cocktail is aromatic and liqueur based, and has a complex character that must reach the nose use a wide mouthed Cocktail Glass.
    C. Red Wine Glasses for cocktails that have a Red Wine as the base spirit. Red Wine Glasses have a wider mouth and a long stem, so that the wine can be swirled an aerated to release the aroma while the long stem keeps the fingers away and avoid quick warming of the wine.
    D. White Wine Glasses for cocktails with a White Wine base, since White Wines must not be aerated as much as a Red Wines, since they oxidise fast when in contact with air, White Wine glassware, in contrast to the wide mouthed bowl of a Red Wine Glassware, is narrow with a narrow mouth. A White Wine has much lighter and delicate notes and the narrow mouth and less surface area in contact with air helps retain the aroma.
    E. If your cocktail is based on a Sparkling Wine like Champagne then a Flute Glass is more suitable since a Sparkling Wine is a White Wine with a secondary fermentation that produces the bubbles, and the narrow mouth flute prevents the bubbles from escaping.
    F. If it's winter and you are in the mood for some hot cocktails like the Irish Coffee or Hot Toddy, go for the Irish Coffee Glass, it has a heat resistant glass and a handle.
    G. Martini Glasses for Martinis or "Tinis" in general, but since these glasses have fallen off of favour these days, a Cocktail Glass will be good too.
    H. IF you are serving Margaritas, don't look for Margarita Glass if you don't have one at home, Double Old Fashioned Glass or other glasses are more common these days, for serving Margaritas.
    I. If you are the adventurous one, and are serving shots or shooters, of course the Shot Glass is your choice of glass,
    J. Finally, if you are going all out and serving depth charges and car bomb shots, all you need is a Double Old Fashioned Glass or a Beer Mug for the beer and a shot glass to drop the bomb in.

Please Note All Recipes and Articles on this site are for entertainment and general information only. None of it is to be considered final or absolutely correct or medical in nature.

All photos used are representative and don't reflect the actual look of a cocktail. Representative Cocktail Photos are watermarked with FreePik logo and are mostly random cocktail images from FreePik.
Contact Us using the Email Contact on the Sidebar if you think any Copyrighted photo has been unintentionally used on this site, and we'll take remedial action.
Photos sourced from Royalty Free Photo Platforms like FreePik, Unsplash and Wikimedia Commons

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *